Was wir tun HEKS
Christian Bobst
What we do

Our projects

HEKS/EPER is making a difference in the «Social inclusion» in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo is rich in natural resources. Yet there is considerable poverty in the society. Moreover, bad governance and strife have rendered the social and political situation highly unstable. The crime rate is high and violence against women is rife. Land conflicts lead repeatedly to violence and ethnic tensions. HEKS/EPER is playing a part in conflict prevention and resolution and assists farming families in securing their right to own land and in boosting agricultural output.

Armed conflict has been raging in the Democratic Republic of the Congo for over 20 years now. The poor security situation has led to a severe and protracted humanitarian crisis. Displacements and the destruction of property and infrastructure have left the majority of the 89 million Congolese living under the direst of conditions. Refugee movements and violence have also destroyed social networks. HEKS/EPER is providing emergency aid in the especially hard-hit province of North Kivu.

HEKS/EPER in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Facts

In 2019 HEKS/EPER assisted 93’250 people in claiming their rights in this conflict-ridden environment, secured land for 500 people and provided ongoing training for another 10’000 people in matters of land rights.

HEKS/EPER promoted market access for 8500 peasant families and provided emergency aid as well as access to water and sanitary facilities for some 110’000 people displaced by the civil war.

Ever more people are being excluded because of their social background, ethnicity, age, gender or religion. Integrating people with a migration background can be compounded, for example, by the lack of the requisite language proficiency, ignorance of Switzerland's cultural specificities or by disadvantages on the job market. HEKS/EPER works actively to ensure that the affected people have access to education, work, government programmes and services. But integration is incumbent on society as a whole, which calls for openness as well as regulatory structures that ensure the right of social participation for all. This implies that everyone has the same rights and opportunities and that features such as gender, age, social background, nationality or religion do not give rise to discrimination.